Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Alphabet, Hartford, PG&E and more

Finance

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google

Michael Short | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Check out the companies making headlines after the bell:

Alphabet — Google parent company Alphabet‘s shares slid 4% after hours despite beating earnings estimates for the fourth quarter, as the company came in light on revenue. The company reported earnings of $15.35 per share on revenue of $46.08 billion, while analysts estimated earnings of $12.53 per share on revenue of $46.94 billion, according to Refinitiv. The company also reported YouTube and cloud revenue for the first time.

Hartford Financial Services Group — The financial company’s stock dropped nearly 1% in extended trading after the company reported strong fourth-quarter results that beat analysts’ estimates. The company reported $1.43 per share on revenue of $5.36 billion, while analysts estimated $1.32 per share on revenue of $5.25 billion, according to Refinitiv. The company also raised its quarterly dividend by 8%.

PG&E — The natural gas company’s stock rose 1.6% in extended trading after the company submitted an updated Chapter 11 bankruptcy plan. Under the new plan, PG&E will have an “enhanced safety structure, improved operations, and a board of management team focused on providing safe, reliable, and clean energy our customers expect,” the company said in a filing.

NXP Semiconductors — Shares of the semiconductor manufacturing company dipped slightly below the flatline after the company reported a beat on its revenue. The company reported $2.3 billion while analysts estimated $2.28 billion, according to Refinitiv. NXP’s first-quarter guidance was also above estimates as the company reported $2.23 billion while analysts estimated $2.17 billion, according to Refinitiv.

— CNBC’s Jennifer Elias contributed to this report.

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