Month: January 2020

Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk gestures while introducing the newly unveiled all-electric battery-powered Tesla Cybertruck at Tesla Design Center in Hawthorne, California on November 21, 2019. FREDERIC J. BROWN | AFP | Getty Images Tesla bear Bank of America was forced to hike its forecast on the electric carmaker’s stock, after its massive rally
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A Boeing 737 MAX 9 is pictured outside the factory in Renton, Washington. Stephen Brashear | Getty Images Boeing is set to report fourth quarter earnings before the bell Wednesday. Here’s what Wall Street is expecting: EPS: $1.47 according to Refinitiv analyst estimates Revenue: $21.67 billion according to Refinitiv analyst estimates. Boeing is struggling through
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There are plenty of ways to make a mistake when drafting a résumé. Take advice from Amanda Augustine, career-advice expert for TopResume, in order to ensure that you’re representing yourself in a way that will impress recruiters. ————————————————– Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ————————————————– Business
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Read ‘Why bond yields are so low’ : http://on.ft.com/2e9kOE0 Negative yielding bonds are bonds which have a negative interest rate. It means that when a person buys those bonds, instead of generating profit, they lose money. Why would anyone buy such bonds then? Some institutions are forced legally, others are betting and hope to make
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Back in the 1990s, Portugal faced a heroin crisis. Most people knew someone affected by the lethal drug. Just two decades later, the country has one of the lowest drug-related death rates in the world. This dramatic turnaround isn’t credited to a hard-line approach, but instead by decriminalizing all drugs. Video by Tom Gibson ———-
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Kathy Kraninger, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images The agency created in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis to protect consumers from abuse is being gutted from the inside, according to some consumer advocates and legal experts. A new enforcement policy at the Consumer Financial Protection
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Starbucks President and Chief Executive Officer Kevin Johnson is pictured at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders in Seattle, Washington on March 20, 2019. Jason Redmond | AFP | Getty Images Starbucks on Tuesday reported quarterly earnings that beat analysts’ expectations, but investors focused on its warning that the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak could deal a blow to
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Consumer confidence in the U.S. grew more than expected in January as the outlook around the labor market improved, data released Tuesday by The Conference Board showed. The Board’s consumer confidence index rose to 131.6 this month from 126.5 in December. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected consumer confidence to rise to 128. Lynn Franco,
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Emirates Flight Catering in Dubai makes all the snacks, main dishes and desserts served aboard the airline’s 200,000 flights each year. The facility runs 24-7, dishing out 110 million meals a year. Emirates’ 1,800 chefs from around the world create region-specific menus for each flight. A previous version of this video inaccurately identified lamb chops
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►Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs John Nash, the US mathematician who has died at 86, is hailed with putting game theory at the heart of economics. Ferdinando Giugliano explains why his work is so important and how the Nash equilibrium theory works. ► FT Wealth: http://bit.ly/1e3996C ► FT Global Economy: http://bit.ly/1J5mmqH ►
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In less than one year, WeWork went from having a $47 billion valuation and being the darling of the venture capital world to needing an $8 billion infusion to avoid running out of money. This is the story of Adam Neumann, Softbank’s risky investment, a failed IPO and how we got here. ——– Like this
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U.S. Treasury yields are sliding, and that could negatively impact financial institutions, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday. “Worries about a worldwide slowdown mean people will buy [U.S.] Treasurys, and when people buy Treasurys, interest rates go down,” the “Mad Money” host said. “Lower long-term rates translate to lower earnings for the banks, which is why
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Laborers work in the Qingdao branch of SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile in Qingdao, China. STR | AFP | Getty Images Automakers are withdrawing employees from China and weighing whether to suspend manufacturing in the country as the virus that emerged in Wuhan less than a month ago ravages the mainland. Most major automakers have restricted or banned
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