Financial hangover? Here are some quick fixes to help you recover

Personal Finance

Rawpixel | Getty Images

Rawpixel | Getty Images

1. Create a budget

Not having a budget is probably what got you here in the first place. Keeping track of how much you bring in versus how much you spend is vital to prevent future budget busts.

Some experts recommend looking at three to six months’ worth of bills to help form a budget; others say at least a year. If that sounds too dizzying, try keeping things simple. Start by listing your income and fixed expenses — things like rent, car payments, utilities, etc. While this won’t give you a total view, it’s a good place to start.

Consider using apps like Mint or YouNeedABudget. These will track your expenses and can help you create a more complete budget.

2. Sell unwanted gifts

Your mother may think that the sweater she bought looks great on you, but maybe it’s not really your style. Or perhaps your uncle got you a video game you already had. Instead of letting these unwanted gifts collect dust, consider selling them on the  secondhand market.

Social media guru and serial entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk is a firm believer in selling unwanted treasures. On his popular vlog “Trash Talk,” the firebrand CEO drives around suburban New Jersey hunting for garage sales where he might discover once-prized — or never loved — items. Vaynerchuk told CNBC  he is “watching people literally go from being homeless to building up $50,000 to $100,000,” in an interview earlier this year.

Sites like Poshmark, Facebook’s marketplace, and eBay allow users to buy and sell goods. Spend some time taking flattering pictures of the items you want to sell and begin posting them. Any income generated from sales can be put towards paying down your debt.

3. Consider a ‘Dry January’

Consider a Dry January. When you give your liver time to recover, you’ll be giving your wallet a break, too.

It is no secret that dining out with drinks and imbibing at bars and nightclubs can make it harder to save money. With a Dry January, you’ll consume no alcoholic beverages for the full 31 days of the month. With your extra savings, you’ll be able to pay your bills faster.

4. Switch to cash

Credit and debit cards make transactions seamless, especially when it comes to online shopping. Research has shown that paying with cash, on the other hand, is more painful than paying with plastic.

Vera Kandybovich / EyeEm

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